It's time for a martini.

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

(via npr)

hipsterfood:

This is one of those things I’ve been dying to try making for years, but never got around to it because it seemed hard. On the contrary, it only took about an hour out of my weekend and made the house smell amazing - and now I’ve made enough to last me a few weeks! So if you’re interested in drinking hot, sweet, spicy, complex chai, try this out and save yourself years (!) of just thinking about it.
Ingredients
1 tsp each ground cardamom, nutmeg, black peppercorns
1 tbsp whole cloves
1-inch piece of ginger root, sliced into medallions
2-3 cinnamon sticks
1 vanilla bean pod, sliced open
3 pieces star anise
3-4 tablespoons whole-leaf black tea leaves - we used Earl Grey Creme c/o The Tea Company
3/4 cup molasses or sugar (such as sugar in the raw)
4 cups boxed coconut milk (found in the refrigerated section) - we used canned coconut milk but found it too fatty for this drink. Almond milk would also work in this recipe.
Other equipment you’ll need: a fine-mesh bag and a mesh strainer, a funnel if you’re working with small openings, also a large glass bottle with a top for storage. 
If you don’t care so much about the residue of powdered spices, a mesh strainer will work just fine by itself. Use whole spices, alternatively.
Get a stronger tea by using whole spices instead of ground, and/or let the mixture steep on the stove longer.
Instructions
Pour all of the ingredients into a pot and turn the heat to medium. Stir to combine and let sit for about 40 minutes, partially covered, stirring every so often.
Put your mesh bag (or the mesh strainer, if you’ve used whole spices instead of ground) into a large bowl and pour the tea in. Let it strain through, then pour into your storage bottle. I did mine in batches so it was easier to pour.
When you’re ready to make drinks, fill your cup(s) up halfway, then the rest with a strongly brewed straight-up hot black tea. Top with a dusting of cinnamon and drink it up!
If you’re using this later on, after it’s been refrigerated, just shake it a bunch of times before you pour it out - sometimes it’s even nice to use the metal mesh strainer again, just as you pour it into glasses, to strain out any lumps.
These ingredients make about 4 cups of chai “concentrate”, but you could easily just keep adding more coconut milk as you empty the pot and reuse the spices a few times. I ended up making about 4 batches total, because I love chai so much. It’s a really warming drink that is so comforting as it keeps snowing here every few days. Hope you enjoy it!

hipsterfood:

This is one of those things I’ve been dying to try making for years, but never got around to it because it seemed hard. On the contrary, it only took about an hour out of my weekend and made the house smell amazing - and now I’ve made enough to last me a few weeks! So if you’re interested in drinking hot, sweet, spicy, complex chai, try this out and save yourself years (!) of just thinking about it.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp each ground cardamom, nutmeg, black peppercorns
  • 1 tbsp whole cloves
  • 1-inch piece of ginger root, sliced into medallions
  • 2-3 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 vanilla bean pod, sliced open
  • 3 pieces star anise
  • 3-4 tablespoons whole-leaf black tea leaves - we used Earl Grey Creme c/o The Tea Company
  • 3/4 cup molasses or sugar (such as sugar in the raw)
  • 4 cups boxed coconut milk (found in the refrigerated section) - we used canned coconut milk but found it too fatty for this drink. Almond milk would also work in this recipe.

Other equipment you’ll need: a fine-mesh bag and a mesh strainer, a funnel if you’re working with small openings, also a large glass bottle with a top for storage.

If you don’t care so much about the residue of powdered spices, a mesh strainer will work just fine by itself. Use whole spices, alternatively.

Get a stronger tea by using whole spices instead of ground, and/or let the mixture steep on the stove longer.

Instructions

  1. Pour all of the ingredients into a pot and turn the heat to medium. Stir to combine and let sit for about 40 minutes, partially covered, stirring every so often.
  2. Put your mesh bag (or the mesh strainer, if you’ve used whole spices instead of ground) into a large bowl and pour the tea in. Let it strain through, then pour into your storage bottle. I did mine in batches so it was easier to pour.
  3. When you’re ready to make drinks, fill your cup(s) up halfway, then the rest with a strongly brewed straight-up hot black tea. Top with a dusting of cinnamon and drink it up!
  4. If you’re using this later on, after it’s been refrigerated, just shake it a bunch of times before you pour it out - sometimes it’s even nice to use the metal mesh strainer again, just as you pour it into glasses, to strain out any lumps.

These ingredients make about 4 cups of chai “concentrate”, but you could easily just keep adding more coconut milk as you empty the pot and reuse the spices a few times. I ended up making about 4 batches total, because I love chai so much. It’s a really warming drink that is so comforting as it keeps snowing here every few days. Hope you enjoy it!

therumpus:

Here’s today’s Daily GIF!

therumpus:

Here’s today’s Daily GIF!

(Source: illhaveuknowthatiloveyou)

pbsamericanmasters:

"If I’m going to sing like someone else, then I don’t need to sing at all." - Billie Holiday, born on this day in 1915. 

pbsamericanmasters:

"If I’m going to sing like someone else, then I don’t need to sing at all." - Billie Holiday, born on this day in 1915. 

bitteroreo:

beben-eleben:

Two Montreal-based photographers, Claudia Ficca and Davide Luciano, were able to give potholes a whole new meaning. For more photos, click here.

I literally thought this was going to be a photoset about gentrification.

(via dougieplaysbanjo)

smartgirlsattheparty:

Final sentences: 

When we come to it
We must confess that we are the possible
We are the miraculous, the true wonder of this world
That is when, and only when
We come to it.

from “A Brave and Startling Truth

She turned out the light and I patted my son’s head lightly and went back to sleep.

from I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

I rise
I rise
I rise.

from “Still I Rise

oldfilmsflicker:

What thoughts I have of you tonight Walt Whitman, for I walked down the sidestreets under the trees with a headache self-conscious looking at the full moon.
In my hungry fatigue, and shopping for images, I went into the neon fruit supermarket, dreaming of your enumerations!
What peaches and what penumbras! Whole families shopping at night! Aisles full of husbands! Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes! — and you, Garcia Lorca, what were you doing down by the watermelons?

I saw you, Walt Whitman, childless, lonely old grubber, poking among the meats in the refrigerator and eyeing the grocery boys.
I heard you asking questions of each: Who killed the pork chops? What price bananas? Are you my Angel?
I wandered in and out of the brilliant stacks of cans following you, and followed in my imagination by the store detective.
We strode down the open corridors together in our solitary fancy tasting artichokes, possessing every frozen delicacy, and never passing the cashier.

Where are we going, Walt Whitman? The doors close in an hour. Which way does your beard point tonight?
(I touch your book and dream of our odyssey in the supermarket and feel absurd.)
Will we walk all night through solitary streets? The trees add shade to shade, lights out in the houses, we’ll both be lonely.
Will we stroll dreaming of the lost America of love past blue automobiles in driveways, home to our silent cottage?
Ah, dear father, graybeard, lonely old courage-teacher, what America did you have when Charon quit poling his ferry and you got out on a smoking bank and stood watching the boat disappear on the black waters of Lethe?

A Supermarket in California by Allen Ginsberg

(Source: youtube.com)

I absolutely adore this little matryoshka doll my niece made from felt.

I absolutely adore this little matryoshka doll my niece made from felt.