It's time for a martini.

Overheard on the way to class

"Well then, who did you get that text from," she asked.
“I don’t know what you’re talking about,” he said.
She had started crying and sounded whiney.
I passed them on the curb and tried not to look sideways.
She asked him who the text was from again and he laughed.
“I told you if you didn’t knock it off I would block you,” he said.
She was becoming unhinged, begging him to tell her about the text.
He seemed to be enjoying it.
I walked faster to put more distance between us.

dougieplaysbanjo:

jennywilbury:

Happy Weedster, Easter Bunnies.

eat those ears first

hazlittmag:

The fit body is thus the conspicuous product of the late-capitalist work ethic. It is the body as the focal point of an industry of self-care, a book of personal narrative upon which is inscribed the extent to which you have won at the game of contemporary life. Each hard-fought-for, shiny ripple of muscle is forever bound up in two economies—one of production, and one of desire.
Must Fit Bodies Be the Products of Hard Work? by Navneet Alang
READ THE REST

hazlittmag:

The fit body is thus the conspicuous product of the late-capitalist work ethic. It is the body as the focal point of an industry of self-care, a book of personal narrative upon which is inscribed the extent to which you have won at the game of contemporary life. Each hard-fought-for, shiny ripple of muscle is forever bound up in two economies—one of production, and one of desire.

Must Fit Bodies Be the Products of Hard Work? by Navneet Alang

READ THE REST

(via hazlittmag)

(via silezukuk)

ourvaluedcustomers:

COMMENTS Magazine by Roz Chast.

ourvaluedcustomers:

COMMENTS Magazine by Roz Chast.

theparisreview:

From 1947, T.S. Eliot reads “The Naming of Cats.” (via)

danielextra:

THINGS TO REGULATE…according to the GOP

danielextra:

THINGS TO REGULATE…according to the GOP

(via political-cartoons)

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

(via npr)